Natural Cytokine Antioxidant

Natural Cytokine Antioxidant

The term “IMune” is derived from “integrated immune system”. In biology, resistance to pathogen is the ability of various multicellular organisms to effectively resist foreign microorganisms. Resistance to infection involves both nonspecific and specific components. Nonspecific elements act as physical barriers or eliminator of a broad spectrum of pathogenic organisms regardless of their infective nature. Specific components, on the other hand, are directed towards specific infections such as those resulting from bacteria, fungi, viruses, protozoa and algae.

imune

Nonspecifically designed antibodies (Anti-BIO) are used to combat various noninfectious agents such as; shingles, HIV, hepatitis C, ticks, fleas, dust mites, bacteria and other arthropods. They directly affect the innate immune response of the cells by enhancing the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. The cytokines in the body are then released to produce a strong defense against the invading agent. In this way, the inflammatory response is controlled and the organism is protected.

Many therapeutic agents that have strong anti-inflammatory properties can be derived from plants such as: Aloe, chickweed, Echinacea, gingko biloba, ginseng, ginger, turmeric, olive leaf extract, and ginger (Allium cepa). Several specialized enzymes are also used for the synthesis of cytokines. These include: superoxide dismutase (SOD), cysteine synthetase (CS), and lectin I and section II. In addition, several pharmacological agents including: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, interferon, oral antibiotics, trihalomethane (THM), oral hypoglycerol, leupeptin, leupeptase (KLP), albicans, complementary, salicylic acid, and sulfamethoxazole.

Imune is produced by the cells of the innate immune system. It functions through the inflammatory response in which T-cells and other white blood cells to destroy the intracellular pathogens. Imune functions in an oxygen-dependent environment. Imune is required for the maintenance of the integrity of the macrophage layer. The intracellular pathogens that invade the human body are believed to deliver proteins that enable the macrophages to produce molecules that attack these pathogens. The presence of this protein, together with the assistance of other molecules, allows the macrophages to engulf the intracellular organism and kill it.

Since the body’s natural barriers are ineffective against most pathogenic organisms, many of them will survive and multiply within the body. These organisms include bacteria, yeasts, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and others. An imbalance in the natural immunity leads to the production of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the body, which triggers the immune response. The IgG-mucus interaction then stimulates inflammatory responses, which includes the release of histamine that destroys bacteria, viruses, and fungi.

In the laboratory, scientists have found that Imune stimulates the release of a substance called interleukin-6 (IL-6). This substance helps suppress the Th1/Th2 cytokines and interferon that are important in triggering the immune response. Other researchers have found that the natural defense mechanisms of the body, such as interferon gamma, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1 beta, are also activated by Imune. They suggest that Imune may act like a natural pro-inflammatory cytokine that protects the organism from bacterial and viral infections.